CALL FOR PROPOSALS:

ANGLO-AMERICAN POLITICS IN TRANSITION: AFTER BREXIT AND TRUMP

This short course will be offered by the British Politics Group on Wednesday, September 29, 2021, in conjunction with the APSA Meeting in Seattle, Washington.

Recent years have seen unprecedented upheavals in both British and US politics. The 2016 referendum on continued membership of the European Union caused deep divisions in British politics, leading to two general elections, parliamentary gridlock and public demonstrations. Formal withdrawal was achieved in early 2020 and the trade deal announced on Christmas Eve, taking effect on 1st January 2021. Meanwhile in the USA the defeat of Donald Trump in November’s presidential election led to his calling the result into question and the storming of Congress.

Now, with both Brexit and the Presidential election resolved the aim of this one-day short course is to explain why these events happened and what the future holds. The ‘special relationship’ between the UK and the US may be challenged as never before. President Biden has professed his support for the European Union and disappointment at Britain’s withdrawal. Several leading advocates of Brexit had pinned their hopes on a trade deal with the US under the seemingly more sympathetic presidency of Mr Trump. The change of presidency may pose an obstacle to obtaining a trade deal going forward.

The future of US and UK politics is open to speculation in other ways. Some commentators on both sides of the Atlantic argued that the Trump presidency and Brexit were expressions of ‘populism’. Some hope that the apparent rejection of populism in the US with the election of Joe Biden will also spell the end of populism in Britain. However, for the moment at least, cultural conflicts remain deep in both countries.

Recent events also bring into new focus the role of both the US and the UK in geopolitics. There are numerous issues here but to name but two – what will relations between both countries and China be like going forward? There is a growing anti-China sentiment in the UK government. Some have argued that Biden will be more friendly towards China while others have questioned that. Will the UK and US reach a shared position on China and, if so, what will it look like? A second issue is the role of both countries in working towards common environmental goals. Trump was a skeptic on global warming but both Biden and Johnson have expressed a desire to bring about a new international agreement here.

Finally, both countries have been severely challenged by the global pandemic, being among the worst affected countries in the developed world. Will this lead to a new social and economic settlement in both countries?

The short course is organized by the British Politics Group and convened by Dr Kevin Hickson of the University of Liverpool, UK. Offers of papers and panels will be encouraged with the aim of having a full day event consisting of four full panels bringing together scholars from the US and the UK. Please send proposals to Dr. Hickson at K.Hickson[AT]liverpool.ac.uk

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: THE 2021 APSA ANNUAL MEETING

Submissions are now being accepted for the British Politics Group at the 2021 APSA Meeting in Seattle, Washington!

The deadline for proposals is Thursday, January 14, 2021 at 11.59pm Pacific time.

The British Politics Group welcomes proposals for papers, panels, roundtables and other innovative formats on any topic related to British politics for the 2021 APSA annual meeting in Seattle, Washington. We are open to proposals that focus on the United Kingdom as a case study as well as those that provide comparative perspectives on British politics. Proposals may wish to consider the theme for the 2021 APSA Annual Meeting, “Promoting Pluralism,” which invites participants to consider the intellectual pluralism of political science as a discipline (methods, behavior, institutions, and perspectives), to explore cross- and multi-disciplinary conversations, and to embrace the diversity of scholars in our community. We are open to any and all worthy proposals, especially those from junior scholars or those new to the group. Proposals might address, for example, pluralism and democracy in the context of British or devolved institutions; the impact of significant constitutional changes in recent decades on the coherence and stability of British democracy; the challenges of governing or exercising political agency in a diverse and divided Britain; or the impacts of significant economic and social inequality on British politics and society.

Note that all proposals must go through the APSA on-line process and must be submitted by the regular APSA deadline, January 14, 2021, at 11.59pm (Pacific time). Please follow APSA guidelines for submissions, e.g., paper proposals will need an abstract of the paper and full contact details for the presenter(s); panel proposals will need panelist names, paper titles, and abstracts. Please also note that all presenters including co-authors must be dues-paying members of the BPG in order to appear on the program (presenters may join the BPG after acceptance to the conference).

Information about the British Politics Group, including membership information, may be found at britishpoliticsgroup.com Additional questions may be addressed to the Program Chair, Holly Jarman, at hjarman[AT]umich.edu or BPG Executive Director, Janet Laible, at jml6[AT]lehigh.edu

The BPG is pleased to announce our panel at the APSA 2020 (Virtual) Meeting*:

“Britain After Brexit”

Chair: Scott L. Greer, University of Michigan

Papers:

June Park and Troy Stangarone, Korea Economic Institute: “From Rules Makers to Rules Takers: The UK’s Choice on Huawei amid Brexit and AI”

Hannah Willis, University of Exeter: “Revisiting the Link Between Competitiveness and Turnout with Longitudinal Data”

Oleg Kodolov, University of Toronto: “The Obstacles to Brexit: Judiciary, Parliament, and the European Union”

Discussant: Nina Simeonova Barzachka, College of the Holy Cross

* Provisionally scheduled for Thursday, September 10, 2pm to 3:30pm (Pacific Daylight Time). We will update this information as we are able!

Brexit: Transforming Politics, Policy, and Institutions

28 August 2019

Co-sponsored by the British Politics Group and the Political Studies Association (UK), with support from the British Journal of Politics and International Relations

A one-day short course at the 2019 APSA Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. at the Marriott Wardman Park, Room: Virginia C

PANEL 1 — REGIONS, IDENTITIES, AND THE CONTEXT OF BREXIT

9:15 – 10:15

Chair: Janet Laible, Lehigh University

“A Tale of Many Cities: London and the Future of Brexit Britain,” Tim Oliver, Loughborough University London

“Why March for the Nation? The Causes of Irish and British Identity-Activism in Northern Ireland, 2006-2016,” Adam Brodie, University of Oxford

BREAK  10:15 – 10:30

PANEL 2 — BREXIT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY

10:30 – 11:45

Chair: Andrew Russell, University of Liverpool

“EU Single Market(s) After Brexit,” Michelle Egan, American University

Paper is part of a special issue of Politics and Governance Vol. 7 No. 3 (2019) edited by Ferdi De Ville and Gabe Sils Brugge; all articles are open access and available to download. Egan’s paper is available here.

“International Trade Policy in a Post-Brexit World,” Holly Jarman, University of Michigan

“Brexit: Implications for Social Policy,” Scott L. Greer, University of Michigan

BREAK FOR LUNCH, 11:45 – 13:30

PANEL 3 — PARTY LEADERSHIP AND THE CHALLENGES OF BREXIT

13:30 – 14:30

Chair: Matt Beech, University of Hull

“Evaluating Theresa May as Prime Minister: Constraint and Choice in the Disjunctive Premiership,” Chris Byrne, Leeds Beckett University; Nick Randall, Newcastle University; and Kevin Theakston, University of Leeds

Byrne_Randall_Theakston_Paper

“Corbyn, Brexit, and State Aid: Prospects for a Revived British Industrial Policy,” Tom Wraight, Copenhagen Business School

BREAK  14:30 – 14:45

PANEL 4 — ROUNDTABLE: BREXIT – WHAT’S NEXT?

14:45 – 16:15

Chair: Terrence Casey, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Participants:

Marc Geddes, University of Edinburgh

Henry Farrell, George Washington University

Matt Beech, University of Hull

Kevin Hickson, University of Liverpool

AS A GENTLE REMINDER: APSA short courses are intended only for APSA Annual Meeting attendees. You must register for the full APSA conference and the short course if you are presenting or attending. The short course fee – set by APSA – is $25. You will need to check in at the main APSA Conference Registration area in order to pick up your short course badge prior to attending. Based on past experience, APSA will be rather strict about enforcing these rules.

The BPG is pleased to announce our panel at the main APSA Conference!

Brexit and the Reordering of British Politics

Thursday, 29 August 2019, 10:00 – 11:30am, Hilton – Fairchild East

Co-sponsored with the European Politics and Society Division

Chair: Terrence Casey, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Papers:

“‘Multiculturalism’ in Policy, Law and Theory: Britain, Brexit and Beyond,” Richard T. Ashcroft, University of California, Berkeley; Mark Bevir, University of California, Berkeley

“A Kingdom Divided: Brexit and the Reimagining of Labour’s Ideational Traditions,” Matt Beech, University of Hull

“Brexit and the Scottish National Tradition,” Stacey Spring, Boston University

“Brexit and the Conservative Tradition,” Kevin Hickson, University of Liverpool

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Brexit – Transforming Politics, Policy, and Institutions

A short course organized by the British Politics Group at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Wednesday, 28 August 2019, Washington, DC.

Note: deadline EXTENDED until 7 June 2019; we will continue to review proposals after that as long as there is still space on the agenda. Please submit a proposal!

When the British electorate voted in June 2016 to leave the European Union, the decision shook the political establishment of the country. Three years later, the consequences of that vote are still reverberating. The Brexit vote has roiled political parties, government authority, public administration, the economy, and almost every quarter of British domestic and foreign policy. This short course organized by the British Politics Group will explore the on-going ramifications of the Brexit vote from the perspectives of an international gathering of scholars.

Most significantly, Brexit will transform the British economy and Britain’s relationship with the EU-27, with some predicting an economic disaster for the UK and others optimistic about the reinvigoration of the British economy. What will Britain’s new relationship with the EU resemble, and who will the winners and losers of the new arrangements be, in the UK and in the EU? Will the UK be able to strike new trade deals with other major global actors? Will the “Special Relationship” be undermined, enhanced, or unchanged by Britain’s new status? How will the UK’s relations with its nearest neighbors, including Ireland and France, change?

Brexit has introduced new dynamics into every significant political institution, including the country’s main political parties. With both Labour and the Conservatives divided on the issue, what will the state of the parties be as Brexit takes its final form? Will populists continue to challenge the mainstream British parties, or with Brexit a “done deal”, will a new map of electoral space emerge? Policy-making is also undergoing a massive disruption, particularly in domains where the UK has not made policy independently for nearly five decades. How will British institutions manage the post-Brexit policy load? Will policy be innovative and distinctive once it is freed from the collective decision-making processes of the EU (as promised by many Brexit supporters)? Where and to what extent will the policy preferences of the EU be ‘sticky’?

At a more fundamental level, the Brexit vote has provoked new debates about the constitution of the United Kingdom and re-animated older debates thought to be resolved. From questions about the impact of Brexit on the legal order of the country, to contention about political and economic relations among England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, where Brexit has reawakened questions about the Irish border and the peace process, Brexit has deeply unsettled the political status quo. What will British sovereignty look like in the wake of Brexit? How will regional politics be transformed by the end of UK membership in the EU? Will the British state survive in its current form?

In this short course, panelists from the BPG and from the broader APSA membership will examine these questions and others, in order to assess the course of Brexit and its repercussions on British politics and beyond. Interested participants should contact the short course organizer, Janet Laible (Lehigh University) at jml6@lehigh.edu no later than 1 May 2019 [extended to June 7!]. NOTE: Accepted participants are requested to become members of the British Politics Group and must register for the full APSA conference in order to register for the short course. Short course registration involves a small fee that is collected by APSA.

Brexit and Beyond:

Implications for British and European Politics

Co-sponsored by the British Politics Group and the Political Studies Association, with support from the British Journal of Politics and International Relations

A one-day short course at the 2018 APSA Annual Meeting, Boston, MA; Wednesday, 29 August 2018 at the John B. Hynes Veterans Memorial Convention Center, Boston: Room 301

PANEL 1 — POLICY AND POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF BREXIT

CHAIR: TBD

0900-1015

“The Legal Consequences of Brexit,” Kelley Littlepage, University of Houston

“The Brexit Time Bomb: Are We Witnessing the Disintegration of the UK?” Peter Moloney, Boston College

Moloney_paper

“UK Policy-Making in a Post-Brexit World,” Richard Rose, University of Strathclyde

Richard_Rose_presentation

BREAK 1015-1030

 

PANEL 2 — IMPLICATIONS OF BREXIT FOR THE EU – I

CHAIR: Tim Bale, Queen Mary University, London

1030-1145

“Understanding Brexit: Process-Tracing, Critical Junctures and Institutional Reform,” Nina S. Barzachka, Dickinson College

“Getting out from Under those Judges? What Brexit Conflicts over the Court of Justice Reflects About British and EU Politics,” Lisa Conant, University of Denver

Conant

Conant_Figures

Conant_Table

“A Renewed Project for Europe: Brexit and the Future of EU Enlargement Policy,” Jamie Scalera, Georgia Southern University

Scalera Brexit APSA 2018

BREAK 1145-1200

PANEL 3 — BREXIT AND POLITICAL PARTY MEMBERSHIP

CHAIR: Terrence Casey, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

1200-1315

“‘The Secret of Leaving’: Who Quits Their Party and Why? Grassroots Members in the UK,” Tim Bale, Queen Mary University, London; Monica Polletti, Queen Mary University, London; and Paul Webb, University of Sussex

BalePolettiWebb

“From Multi-speed to multi-stream? Recognising the motivations, processes, and triggers in a multi-stream activation model of party membership,” Katharine Dommett, University of Sheffield; and Sam Power, University of Sheffield

Dommett_Power

“Brexit and the SNP: Threat or Opportunity?” Rob Johns, University of Essex; James Mitchell, University of Edinburgh; and Lynn Bennie, University of Aberdeen

“Determined and Distinctive Britishness: The Democratic Unionist Party’s Membership,” Jon Tonge, University of Liverpool; Sophie Whiting, University of Bath; Jim McAuley, University of Huddersfield; and Thomas Hennessey, Canterbury Christ Church University

Tonge et al Final

LUNCH 1315-1445

 

PANEL 4 — IMPLICATIONS OF BREXIT FOR THE EU – II

CHAIR: Janet Laible, Lehigh University

1445-1600

“A Stronger European Union? The Unexpected Security Consequences of Brexit ,” Federiga Bindi, University of Rome Tor Vergata and SAIS Johns Hopkins University

Bindi

“The Political Economy of Social Europe after Brexit,” Scott Greer, University of Michigan

Greer

“European Union Trade Policy in the Wake of the Brexit Vote,” Holly Jarman, University of Michigan

Jarman

BREAK 1600-1615

PANEL 5 — THE NATIONS OF THE UK AND BREXIT

CHAIR: Nina S. Barzachka, Dickinson College

1615-1730

“Brexit’s Scottish Dimension: Dual Identities and Qualified Support for the EU,” Marco Biagi, Yale University

Biagi

“Brexit and Historical Precedent: The Dangers of Underestimating the SNP,” Stacey Gorski Spring, Boston University

GorskiSpring

“United Kingdom and United Europe: The Implications of Brexit for Continued Unity,” A. Maurits van der Veen, College of William & Mary

AS A GENTLE REMINDER: APSA short courses are intended only for APSA Annual Meeting attendees. You must register for the full APSA conference and the short course if you are presenting or attending. The short course fee – set by APSA – is $25. You will need to check in at the main APSA Conference Registration in order to pick up your short course badge prior to attending. Based on past experience, APSA will be rather strict about enforcing these rules.

CALL FOR PAPERS: “Brexit and Beyond: Implications for British and European Politics”

Short course sponsored by the British Politics Group at the 2018 APSA Conference, Boston, MA (USA)

Wednesday, 29 August 2018

The decision of British voters in June 2016 to leave the European Union initiated an unprecedented period of turmoil and transformation in both British and European politics. This short course sponsored by the British Politics Group will gather key scholars from the UK, Europe, and the US to explore these issues.

The most significant impacts of Brexit relate to foreign relations and the economy. What will be the political and economic relationship between Britain and the EU post-Brexit? Will the economy be the disaster that Remainers predicted? What will be the impact on the continent’s economies? If Britain leaves the Single Market, can it establish new trade deals – and on what terms — with other major economic actors, especially China and the United States? What will become of the special relationship once the UK is no longer a conduit for America to Europe?  Brexit will also inexorably alter the trajectory of European integration (or dis-integration). How will British departure from the EU affect European institutions and the remaining Member States?

British domestic politics is also in a state of extreme flux. Since 2014, Britain has held a referendum on Scottish independence, two general elections (both with surprise results) and, of course, the Brexit vote. Collectively these have shaken the foundations of British party and electoral politics. Conservative leader Theresa May is in office yet not exactly in power, having spectacularly failed by losing her majority in a snap 2017 election. Meanwhile Jeremy Corbyn, that most implausible of potential Prime Ministers, is potentially poised to lead his Labour Party to victory. The populism that spurred the Leave Campaign to victory, moreover, remains a force. What will be the state of the parties after all this plays out? How will this transform the electoral map heading into the next General Election?

Separating from the EU also raises new problems for the structure of the United Kingdom itself, potentially reconfiguring political and economic relations between England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, where the issue of the border with the Republic of Ireland is already becoming a major concern of the Brexit negotiations. Can the United Kingdom survive Brexit in its current institutional configuration?

In this short course, various panelists from the BPG and beyond will come together to examine the questions raised above, among others, in order to provide a better understanding of the course of British and European politics during the process of Brexit negotiation and beyond. In addition to panelists invited by the BPG, we are open to proposals from other scholars whose research is appropriate to the topics under consideration.

Interested participants should send individual paper or panel proposals to the conference organizer, TERRENCE CASEY (Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology) at casey1@rose-hulman.edu no later than 1 May 2018. Please include an abstract (300 words maximum), institutional affiliation, and e-mail contact. For full panel proposals, please make sure to include a brief panel abstract in addition to the individual paper abstracts, and full contact information for all panel participants. Volunteers to serve as discussants and panel chairs would be greatly appreciated.

IMPORTANT: APSA short courses are intended only for APSA Annual Meeting attendees. You must register for the full APSA conference and the short course if you are presenting or attending. The short course fee – set by APSA – is $25. You will need to check in at the main APSA Conference Registration in order to pick up your short course badge prior to attending. Based on past experience, APSA will be rather strict about enforcing these rules.

Brexit and Trump: What’s Next for the UK, EU and US?

One-Day Conference at UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies Library on Wednesday, August 30, 2017

We are pleased to announce a conference sponsored by the British Politics Group and the Anglo-American Studies Program at UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies Library, on Wednesday, August 30thBrexit and Trump: What’s Next for the UK, EU and US?  The lineup and conference papers are available here.  A highlight will be the keynote address given by David Brady and Doug Rivers of Stanford University at 3:30 p.m. Introducing them will be Andrew Whittaker, HM Consul General to San Francisco, whom we are delighted to welcome.  Following the keynote, we are partnering with the Hansard Society and hosting a post-conference reception.  It would be great to see BPG members there!

The BPG is happy to announce our program for APSA 2017!

If you are attending the APSA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, please attend the two panels of the British Politics Group – check your program for panel locations.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 2017: 12.00pm to 1.30pm
Panel title: New Research on the Brexit Vote
Chair: Jonathan Tonge, University of Liverpool
Discussant: Scott Greer, University of Michigan
Papers:
“Brexit or Block it? Party and Demographic EU divisions in Northern Ireland,”
Authors: Jonathan Tonge, University of Liverpool
Maire Braniff, Ulster University
Thomas Hennessey, Canterbury Christ Church University
Jim McAuley, University of Huddersfield
Sophie Whiting, University of Bath
“Challenging the Narrative of the Left-Behind Brexiter,”
Authors: Lorenza Antonucci
Laszlo Horvath
André Krouwel, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
“Perceptions of Change, Ethnicity, and Immigration Attitudes in Brexit”
Author: Hyun Tae Kim, University of Southern California
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 2017: 10.00am to 11.30am
Panel title: Constructing Public Values in British Politics
Chair: David Parker, Montana State University

Discussant: Terrence Casey, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Papers:

“Why Euroscepticism hindered Europeanization in the UK”
Author: Joo Yeon Park

“Media Ownership Effects and Attitude Change: The Case of the UK Miners’ Strike”
Author: Liam Kneafsey, Trinity College Dublin

“How MP Expenses and Allowances Create Citizen Impressions”
Authors: David CW Parker, Montana State University
Courtney Kellogg, Montana State University